Question Description

Part A:

  • Summarize the presenting problem of the virtual client and create a hypothesis.
  • Select a personality test from the Mental Measurements Yearbook. (Note: You are to select a test that is not listed in this week’s Learning Resources.)
  • Evaluate and explain why this test is most appropriate for assessing the client’s personality and justify your selection.

Part B:

  • Evaluate the Mock Assessment Results provided below.
  • Explain whether the evaluation results support or invalidate your hypothesis of the presenting problem.
  • Justify your response.
  • Briefly describe which additional psychological tests or assessment methods you might consider for your client.
  • Explain two ways that you might integrate the evaluation results into client treatment planning and why.

Resources:

  • Gregory, R. (2013). Psychological testing: History, principles, and applications (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
    • Chapter 8: “Origins of Personality Testing”
    • Chapter 9: ”Assessment of Normality and Human Strengths”
  • Article: Hill, J. S., Pace, T. M., & Robbins, R. R. (2010). Decolonizing personality assessment and honoring indigenous voices: A critical examination of the MMPI-2. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 16(1), 16–25.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycARTICLESdatabase.
  • Article: Butcher, J. N. (2010). Personality assessment from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first century: Past achievements and contemporary challenges. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 6, 1–20.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Annual Reviews database.
  • Article: Cummings, J. A. (2010). Review of ‘evidence-based practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy’. British Journal of Psychology, 101(4), 824–826.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycINFO database.

Mental Measurements Yearbook

  • Test: Schuerger, J. (2001). 16PF adolescent personality questionnaire.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Mental Measurements Yearbook database.
  • Test: McGhee, R. L., Ehrler, D. J., & Buckhalt, J. (2007). Five-factor personality inventory-children.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Mental Measurements Yearbook database.

Media

  • Interactive Media: Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011). Virtual client. Baltimore, MD: Author.
    Transcript

Optional Resources

  • Article: Bornstein, R. F. (2010). Psychoanalytic theory as a unifying framework for 21st century personality assessment. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 27(2), 133–152.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycARTICLES database.
  • Article: Mullen, K. L., & Edens, J. F. (2008). A case law survey of the Personality Assessment Inventory: Examining its role in civil and criminal trials. Journal of Personality Assessment, 90(3), 300–303.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Complete database.
  • Article: Crespi, T. D., & Politikos, N. N. (2008). Personality assessment with adolescents: Challenges and guidelines. Adolescence, 43(171), 593–606.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the CINAHL Plus with Full Text database.
  • Article: Braxton, L. E., Calhoun, P. S., Williams, J. E., & Boggs, C. D. (2007). Validity rates of the personality assessment inventory and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 in a VA medical center setting. Journal of Personality Assessment, 88(1), 5–15.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Complete database.

Client List:

Sean Brody

Age – 8

Race – White

Gender – Male

Ethnicity – Jewish

Veteran Status – None

Immigrant Status – American citizen

Language – English, American Sign Language

Sensory Impairment – Hearing Impaired

Motor Impairment – None

Medical Conditions – High lead levels

Presenting Problem – Behavioral and academic problems in school

Poor peer relationships

Aggression

Affective Symptoms – Irritability

Behavioral Symptoms – School failure

Suspensions and expulsions due to aggression

Isolation from peers

Cognitive Symptoms – Poor concentration and attention in school

Family and Support Systems – Only child

Split custody

Results Intelligence Testing – Weakness in Gs and Gr

Strength in Gf

Results of NEO PI-R – High, open to experience

Low, conscientiousness

Lanie Rosado

Age – 22

Race – Hispanic

Gender – Female

Ethnicity – Puerto Rican

Veteran Status – Enduring Freedom veteran

Immigrant Status – American citizen

Language – English, Spanish

Sensory Impairment – None

Motor Impairment – Fine and gross

Medical Conditions – Severely injured dominant hand

Presenting Problem – Failing in college

Affective Symptoms – Mood swings

Behavioral Symptoms – Impulsivity

Unstable relationships

Cognitive Symptoms – Failing first semester of school

Family and Support Systems – Conflict with family and partner

Results Intelligence Testing – Weakness in Gs

Results of NEO PI-R – High, neuroticism

Low, extraversion

Emma Kinch

Age – 78

Race – Black

Gender – Female

Ethnicity – Bajan

Veteran Status – None

Immigrant Status – Bajan citizen

Language – English

Sensory Impairment – Blind

Motor Impairment – None

Medical Conditions – Hypothyroidism

Presenting Problem – Sad

Withdrawn

Irritable

Affective Symptoms – Depressed

Low energy

Behavioral Symptoms – Aggression

Cognitive Symptoms – Memory impairment

Family and Support Systems – Isolated

Recent death of husband

Results Intelligence Testing – Weakness in Gr

Results of NEO PI-R – High, neuroticism

Low, agreeableness

Part A:Summarize the presenting problem of the virtual client and create a hypothesis.Select a personality test from the Mental Measurements Yearbook. (Note: You are to select a test that is not listed in this week’s Learning Resources.) Evaluate and explain why this test is most appropriate for assessing the client’s personality and justify your selection.Part B:Evaluate the Mock Assessment Results provided below.Explain whether the evaluation results support or invalidate your hypothesis of the presenting problem.Justify your response.Briefly describe which additional psychological tests or assessment methods you might consider for your client.Explain two ways that you might integrate the evaluation results into client treatment planning and why. Resources:Gregory, R. (2013). Psychological testing: History, principles, and applications (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.Chapter 8: “Origins of Personality Testing”Chapter 9: ”Assessment of Normality and Human Strengths” Article: Hill, J. S., Pace, T. M., & Robbins, R. R. (2010). Decolonizing personality assessment and honoring indigenous voices: A critical examination of the MMPI-2. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 16(1), 16–25.Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycARTICLESdatabase. Article: Butcher, J. N. (2010). Personality assessment from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first century: Past achievements and contemporary challenges. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 6, 1–20. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Annual Reviews database. Article: Cummings, J. A. (2010). Review of ‘evidence-based practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy’. British Journal of Psychology, 101(4), 824–826.Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycINFO database.Mental Measurements YearbookTest: Schuerger, J. (2001). 16PF adolescent personality questionnaire. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Mental Measurements Yearbook database.Test: McGhee, R. L., Ehrler, D. J., & Buckhalt, J. (2007). Five-factor personality inventory-children. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Mental Measurements Yearbook database.MediaInteractive Media: Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011). Virtual client. Baltimore, MD: Author.TranscriptOptional Resources Article: Bornstein, R. F. (2010). Psychoanalytic theory as a unifying framework for 21st century personality assessment. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 27(2), 133–152. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycARTICLES database.Article: Mullen, K. L., & Edens, J. F. (2008). A case law survey of the Personality Assessment Inventory: Examining its role in civil and criminal trials. Journal of Personality Assessment, 90(3), 300–303. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Complete database.Article: Crespi, T. D., & Politikos, N. N. (2008). Personality assessment with adolescents: Challenges and guidelines. Adolescence, 43(171), 593–606. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the CINAHL Plus with Full Text database. Article: Braxton, L. E., Calhoun, P. S., Williams, J. E., & Boggs, C. D. (2007). Validity rates of the personality assessment inventory and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 in a VA medical center setting. Journal of Personality Assessment, 88(1), 5–15.Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Complete database.Client List: Sean BrodyAge – 8Race – WhiteGender – MaleEthnicity – JewishVeteran Status – NoneImmigrant Status – American citizenLanguage – English, American Sign Language Sensory Impairment – Hearing ImpairedMotor Impairment – NoneMedical Conditions – High lead levelsPresenting Problem – Behavioral and academic problems in school Poor peer relationships AggressionAffective Symptoms – IrritabilityBehavioral Symptoms – School failure Suspensions and expulsions due to aggression Isolation from peersCognitive Symptoms – Poor concentration and attention in schoolFamily and Support Systems – Only child Split custodyResults Intelligence Testing – Weakness in Gs and Gr Strength in GfResults of NEO PI-R – High, open to experience Low, conscientiousness Lanie RosadoAge – 22Race – HispanicGender – FemaleEthnicity – Puerto RicanVeteran Status – Enduring Freedom veteranImmigrant Status – American citizenLanguage – English, SpanishSensory Impairment – NoneMotor Impairment – Fine and grossMedical Conditions – Severely injured dominant handPresenting Problem – Failing in collegeAffective Symptoms – Mood swingsBehavioral Symptoms – Impulsivity Unstable relationshipsCognitive Symptoms – Failing first semester of schoolFamily and Support Systems – Conflict with family and partnerResults Intelligence Testing – Weakness in Gs Results of NEO PI-R – High, neuroticism Low, extraversionEmma KinchAge – 78Race – BlackGender – FemaleEthnicity – BajanVeteran Status – NoneImmigrant Status – Bajan citizenLanguage – EnglishSensory Impairment – BlindMotor Impairment – NoneMedical Conditions – HypothyroidismPresenting Problem – Sad Withdrawn IrritableAffective Symptoms – Depressed Low energyBehavioral Symptoms – AggressionCognitive Symptoms – Memory impairmentFamily and Support Systems – Isolated Recent death of husband Results Intelligence Testing – Weakness in GrResults of NEO PI-R – High, neuroticism Low, agreeableness