A 23-year-old bisexual man with a history of intravenous drug abuse presents to the clinic with a chief complaint of fever fatigue loss of appetite nausea vomiting abdominal pain and dark urine

A 23-year-old bisexual man with a history of intravenous drug abuse presents to the clinic with a chief complaint of fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and dark urine. He says the symptoms started about a month ago and have gotten steadily worse. He admits to reusing needles and had unprotected sexual relations with a man “a couple months ago”.

PMH-noncontributory.

Social/family history-works occasionally as a night clerk in a hotel. Parents without illnesses. Admits to bisexual sexual relations and intravenous heroin use. He has refused drug rehabilitation. 3 year/pack history of tobacco but denies vaping.

Physical exam unremarkable except for palpable liver edge 2 fingerbreadths below costal margin. No ascites or jaundice appreciated.

The APRN suspects the patient has Hepatitis B given the strong history of risk factors. She orders a hepatitis panel which was positive for acute Hepatitis B.

Question:

What are the important hepatitis markers that indicated the patient had acute hepatitis B?